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Posts for category: Foot Injury

By Dr Arden Smith
September 25, 2019
Category: Foot Injury
                    Soccer and Heel Pain in Children
 
One of the most common soccer injuries we at Advanced Podiatry have seen is the large number of young soccer players complaining of heel pain. This problem is often caused by a condition known as apophysitis of the calcaneus or Sever's disease. This condition consists of an inflammation of the growth area of the heel bone which has not completely matured, or closed together, and has developed into parts. It is most commonly seen in boys and girls between the ages of 10 to 15. The pain is usually present in the back of the heel and is more pronounced in running and jumping sports.
 
The treatment consists of x-ray evaluation to make a proper diagnosis and to rule out any bony fractures. A custom orthotic insert is often needed to correct the biomechanical imbalances which may be causing a jamming affect on the heel plate; additionally, the elimination of any cleated shoes with less than four cleats in the heel area.
 
In summary, watch for any warning signals; when a child complains of heel pain, there is usually a need for examination and the expert podiatrists of Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset, Huntington, Plainview, and Maspeth are here for you..
By Dr. Joseph R. DiStefano
April 28, 2018
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: cleats   spikes   players and sneakers  

The winter is finally over (mostly…although I may have just jinxed us. Apologies loyal readers). Spring sports are in full swing (no pun intended baseball players) and unfortunately, with them come many preventable injuries. The most common that we see are tendonitis, growth plate conditions, and bursitis. The occasional bumps and bruises will generally heal quickly, but lingering problems that won’t get better or become worse can sideline a player or end their season.

 When I evaluate a patient in the office, the first questions I ask are what type of activities are they participating in, what terrain are they playing on, and what shoe gear is required. Usually a combination of these three allows me to properly diagnose the cause of the foot and ankle pain. In my experience, the majority of cleats, spikes and sneakers worn are unsupportive and ill suited to properly handle the high demands of the athlete using them. The best way to support the lower extremities is with a custom orthotic device that is worn in the shoes. With a custom device, the foot and ankle are realigned into the most appropriate anatomical position and will allow an athlete to perform to their highest capability. The sooner we can get you casted and fitted, the sooner you will be out there pounding the pavement, hitting home runs and aces and scoring goals!

By Dr. Evan Vieira
December 04, 2017
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Fracture   Lisfranc fracture  

                                     

A Lisfranc fracture is a common injury of the foot, usually suffered in a high impact fashion.  This causes the 1st and 2nd metatarsal or long bones of the foot to separate.  A Lisfranc injury is sometimes complicated to treat as this is one of the most important supportive ligaments to the structure of the foot.  

This type of injury can require surgery, but with some new advances in technology we have been able too achieve amazing results with the use of a period of immobilization and external bone stimulation devices. Above are images of a female patient who suffered such an injury.  As you can see the bottom of the 2nd metatarsi bone is clearly broken, however the next image shoes it healed in only about 5 weeks!  
 
This is just one example, but if you find yourself with a foot injury we are here for you too!
By Runnersworld.com
April 21, 2017
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: runners   black toenails  
 

                             

As runners, our most valuable possessions are our feet. And while our tootsies may not win any beauty contests (hello, black toenails and blisters galore), their overall health is crucial, as it impacts our entire skeletal structure, explains Dr. Jacqueline Sutera, D.P.M. and spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association. Turns out, there are lots of little things we do everyday that set us back on this front.

Here, Sutera and two other podiatrists share the widely-practiced, surprisingly harmful habits that damage our feet—and what we should do instead.

Cutting out an Ingrown Toenail Yourself
Why It’s Bad: “Almost everyone will suffer from an ingrown toenail during their life, whether it be the result of an injury, poor fitting shoes, or genetics,” explains Dr. Amanda Meszaros, an Ohio-based podiatrist. Many will attempt to resolve the issue with “bathroom surgery,” i.e. an at-home, self-directed procedure, often performed with non-sterile, ineffective instruments. A common result: a splinter that will fester, cause an infection, or trigger a fleshy growth called pyogenic granuloma that results from minor trauma.

What to Do Instead: “Seek professional help early,” advises Meszaros, noting that in-office treatment is easy, simple, and offers quick relief of symptoms.

Running a Race or Distance Run in a New Pair of Shoes

Why It’s Bad: “I see many runners who get close to a race and think ‘Oh crap, I better get a new pair of sneakers!’” says Dr. Lori Weisenfeld, NYC sports podiatrist. But even if you purchase the exact same model, running in fresh sneaks can give you blisters and/or shin splints simply because they haven’t been broken in yet. “I tell patients to never opt for new shoes in a competitive or distance situation,” explains Weisenfeld.

What to Do Instead: Once you find a sneaker brand and model that works well for you, purchase several pairs and alternate usage, advises Weisenfeld. This means you’ll always have a backup come race day.

Committing to One Shoe Size

Why It’s Bad: It’s a common misconception that once you reach adulthood, your shoe size is set in stone. “Many of us buy the same shoe size year after year without regard to structural changes, and attribute new discomfort to simply aging or wear and tear,” says Meszaros. But as we get older, she explains, “our ligaments and tendons become more lax, our arch height decreases, and the shock absorbing fat that pads our feet thins and atrophies, especially in women.”

What’s more, people over 40 will generally gain length over time as well—up to half a shoe size per decade of life.

What to Do Instead: Consider periodic professional measurement, recommends Meszaros. Also, rather than automatically purchasing your go-to number, test out new kicks in-store, and become aware of the variances in size by brand.  

Fitting Your Street Shoes the Same as Your Athletic Shoes

Why It’s Bad: Athletic shoes shouldn’t fit as snugly as street shoes, explains Weisenfeld, because your feet need more wiggle room when engaging in physical activity. Wearing tight-fitting shoes can cause pain and damage your toenails.

What to Do Instead: When it comes to running shoes, Weisenfeld abides by the “rule of thumb,” which dictates a thumb’s width distance between your longest toe and the front of the shoe. If your toes are closer to the edge, try the next size up.  

Wearing Flats on a Regular Basis

Why It’s Bad: “Many women turn to flats as an alternative at work or for a commute on foot,” says Meszaros, acknowledging the shoes are lightweight, portable and flexible. “But these convenient shoes have little to offer in the way of shock absorption and cause increased pressure on the ball of the foot and heel even with moderate walking.” That lack of support can translate into heel pain from repetitive stress, tendonitis from lack of stability, metatarsalgia (forefoot pain) and stress fractures.

What to Do Instead: “Although athletic shoes with professional attire are frowned upon from a fashion standpoint, newer options in lightweight sport-style shoes in more desirable colors and patterns may provide increased cushioning and less risk of fatigue related injuries,” recommends Meszaros.

Walking Barefoot on Hardwood Floors

Why It’s Bad: When treading on hardwood, cement, stone, or ceramic tile, “there is really nothing to absorb the shock between you and the ground,” explains Sutera. Over time, this behavior can deteriorate your fat pad, which serves as the foot’s natural cushion. Again, women should be especially cognizant of fat pad atrophy, Sutera explains, as they’re more likely to develop it due to hormone changes.

What to Do Instead: Limit your barefoot time to carpet or cork flooring only, and wear comfortable, supportive footgear when on harder indoor surfaces. Sutera’s at-home go-to: plush slippers with a cushy arch support.

Wearing Worn-Out Shoes

Why It’s Bad: Wearing worn-down footwear that doesn’t offer the proper support can hurt not just your feet, but your entire skeleton, reiterates Sutera. “When a shoe is old and worn out, it tilts the way that you stand and walk, and can force your foot to land in a way that’s unnatural and damaging.” Sutera’s response to patients who are reluctant to retire well-worn, cloyingly comfy footwear: “Fast food tastes good, but it’s not good for you. Your favorite old shoes may be harming your health.”

What to Do Instead: Determine your shoe health with the “tabletop test,” says Sutera. Place your footwear on the table and examine it at eye level. If the heel is noticeably worn down and/or deformed, it’s time for a new pair.

 
By Dr. Pedram A. Hendizadeh
April 08, 2017
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Sports Injuries   Foot Care   foot  

                                       

Stress fractures

It mostly occurs in athletes who engage in running, basketball, gymnastics, dance and tennis. They are a higher risk due to repetitive stress that is placed on their feet and ankles. Compared to the fracture which is broken a bone, a stress fracture is just a small crack in the bone. It happens when repeated impact happens on a bone, and your muscles are unable to absorb that pressure.

Heel spur

The condition occurs when there are calcium deposits which result to a bony protrusion on your heel bone. Those people who are prone to this kind of state are the athletes with feet that are very flat or high arches. Other factors which may cause it are improper footwear or running on hard surfaces. You will mostly experience extreme pain when you are either standing or walking. Most people can recover without surgery by either physical therapy, muscle or tendon tapping, heel stretching exercises or using anti-inflammatory medications.

Ankle sprain

Like most ankle sports injuries, you can have a moderate ankle sprain which means that you will experience minimal pain or severe making walking or standing difficult or painful. It involves twisting of your foot that causes damage to the ligaments of an ankle. The most common are inversion ankle sprains which are due to the foot twisting inwards damaging the outer ligaments. Outward twisting of the foot usually causes severe damage to your inside ankle ligaments.

 


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Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset at the Americana

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