(516) 869-3300 Manhasset
(631) 427-3678 Huntington
(516) 544-1731 Great Neck
(718) 639-0499 Maspeth
(516) 681-8866 Plainview

Posts for tag: foot

The Princess and her bunions

Meghan Markle is considered one of the world's most beautiful woman.  Always meticulously dressed in designer clothing with stunning high heels.  However, could it be? Is it true? She has bunions?
 
Based on some recent photographs showing red scars to the inside of her left foot, it appears so!  Meghan seems to have had surgery to correct this common foot issue.  
 
A recent article describes how she suffered through painful surgery.  NOT TRUE!  We perform this procedure many times a week here at Advanced Podiatry and most patients have little-to-no pain.  
 
If you want to walking the shoes of a princess come see us today!
By Dr. Quynh P. Lee
October 13, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: shoes   foot   Feet   shoe   socks  

How many times have you purchased a pair of shoes only to find that they do not fit right, are giving you blisters or calluses, and causing you pain? Don’t worry you are not the only one out there! To help with these common issues, follow these tips for a better fitting shoe.     

                                               

                                                                                           

  • If the shoe fits, wear it! Make sure that both the width (the sides of your feet should touch the width of your shoes but NOT push against them) AND the length of the shoe fits. If you are unsure about your shoe size, don’t be afraid to ask for your feet to be measured. Too big of a size can cause your foot to slide around which can lead to blistering, calluses, and even toenail trauma!   
  • Check the size of your shoes. Manufacturer sizing may vary so don’t just assume you are the same size across the board. A half size or size up may drastically affect the fit of the shoe. In addition, shop in the afternoon for shoes! Everyone’s feet swell as the day progresses; the shoe you bought in the morning may be too tight at the end of the day! 
  • If you wear an orthotic, bring them with you to the store! Always try on shoes WITH your custom orthotic. If you do not have a custom orthotic, read our blog and see what a custom orthotic can do for you! Do not just assume every orthotic is created equal.
  • Get a shoe that is made for the activity you want them for. There are shoes especially designed for specific sports, for example: running, basketball, tennis, golf, and soccer just to name a few! Each shoe is designed with specific and different properties for that activity or sport. 
  • Always wear socks with shoes! Wear the socks that you would normally wear with the shoe. If the sock is too thin (i.e a dress sock), don’t wear it when trying on a sneaker. This may affect the fit of the shoe.

If you have foot pain that is not alleviated with change in shoe gear or if you would like us to evaluate your feet- call us and make an appointment today! We offer same day appointments and look forward to meeting you! 

 

 

By Dr. Pedram A. Hendizadeh
April 28, 2017
Category: Foot Tips
Tags: foot   Feet   Injections   Neuroma  
      
 
Sclerotherapy Injections for Morton's Neuroma:  The latest treatment with a high success rate
    
When it comes to the health of our feet, women are much more vulnerable to ailments than men. One such problem that targets women more than men is Morton's Neuroma (perineural fibroma), which is 10 times more likely to affect woman than men.  This painful condition is caused by an enlarged nerve, usually one that runs between the metatarsal heads of the ball of the foot.  Morton's neuroma involves a thickening of the tissue around one of the nerves leading to your toes. It is sometimes referred to as an inter-metatarsal neuroma because of its location, which is usually at the ball of the foot between the third and fourth toes. Problems often develop in this area because of two nerves that intersect and become inflamed.   These nerves are typically larger in diameter than those going to the other toes, causing the nerve to become enlarged.  The thickening, or enlargement, of the nerve that defines a neuroma is the result of compression and irritation of the nerve. This compression creates swelling which eventually leads to a radiating, burning or a shooting type of pain.
Who is at Risk?

There are many factors that contribute to Morton's neuroma, though the condition can arise spontaneously for reasons yet unknown. Flat feet can cause the nerve to be pulled towards the middle of the foot, which can cause irritation and enlargement of the nerve. However, the primary reason  women are more often affected by this condition than men, is the same reason for a host of other foot problems that occur mostly in women – poorly fitted shoes. Statistics show that this condition most often afflicts women in their 30s and 40s. Sorry ladies, but wearing the latest 5-inch heels from Jimmy Choo will contribute greatly to this condition. High-heeled shoes cause weight to be transferred towards the front of the foot, increasing pressure on the ball of the foot. Narrow, pointy, and tight-toe boxes create lateral compression, which squeezes bones, ligaments, muscles, and nerves in the forefoot, causing pain and swelling. 
 
Morton's neuroma can also result from physical activity that over-pronates the foot. Running, racket sports, and certain dances such as ballet, often cause trauma to the foot. This trauma can lead to a build-up of pressure on the ball of the foot. Additionally, an injury or structural defect of the foot can also cause Morton's neuroma. 

Signs and Symptoms: 
 
The pain caused by Morton's neuroma typically develops as an ache in the ball of the foot and progresses to a burning pain. This pain is often described as an intense feeling of pins and needles and a feeling like a pebble stuck inside the ball of the foot. The burning sensation leads to numbness in the second, third and fourth toes. These symptoms begin gradually, with the discomfort occurring when walking, but easing when resting or upon removal of shoes. Some symptoms that indicate Morton's neuroma include: radiating pain from the ball of the foot to the toes, intensifying pain during activity and when wearing shoes, and occasional numbness, discomfort, and tingling. These symptoms may be relieved temporarily by simply massaging the foot or by avoiding extravagant shoes or activities. However, if these instigators are not avoided, symptoms  can become progressively worse and may persist for several days to several weeks. 
 
Morton's neuroma is usually diagnosed by podiatrists.  They perform an exam called Mulder's Sign, where the foot is first squeezed from the sides while pressing down on the ball of your foot, mostly between the third and fourth metatarsal bones. If this squeezing results in extensive pain, as well as a clicking sound, the results are considered positive for Morton's neuroma. Sometimes further testing is needed, such as Diagnostic Ultrasound or MRI Studies.
 
Treatment:

The podiatrist will devise a treatment plan based on the severity and duration of the symptoms. Treatment approaches vary depending on the severity of the problem. Usually, conservative measures are suggested before considering surgery. Some of these treatments include padding, icing, orthotic devices, activity modifications, changes in shoe styles, oral anti-inflammatory medications, and injection therapy. 

Better footwear is probably the first and most important step you can take to alleviate this condition. Wearing a shoe with a wide-toe box and a low heel can reduce pain tremendously. Your doctor may also recommend some sort of padding to provide support to the metatarsal arch, thereby reducing the pressure on the nerve when walking. Custom orthotic devices provide the support needed to reduce pressure and compression on the nerve. 

Modifying physical activities will also go a long way in reducing the severity of Morton's neuroma. Activities that put repetitive pressure on the neuroma should be avoided until the condition improves. In the meantime, to ease the pain, application of an icepack to the affected area can help reduce swelling. Alternatively, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, can also help alleviate pain and swelling. 
 
If after the initial treatment no significant improvement is seen, sclerosing injection therapy is now the treatment of choice with a 94% success rate. In the past, the treatment plan would have been steroid injections followed by surgical excision of the neuroma.  Sclerosing injections were developed several years ago to help alleviate the pain of neuromas.  This conservative treatment option has significantly decreased the need for surgical excision.  The treatment is performed in an office setting. Sclerosing injections consist of a cocktail of 0.5% Marcaine and 4% dehydrated alcohol.   Studies have shown that this small concentration of alcohol can shrink the neuroma and, with the use of ultrasound guidance, sclerosing injections have had an excellent success rate. The majority of patients require a series of five to seven small injections given over the course of three months.  Most patients begin to see improvement after the third or fourth injection.   This novel treatment is effective and is covered by most insurance companies.
By Dr. Pedram A. Hendizadeh
April 08, 2017
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Sports Injuries   Foot Care   foot  

                                       

Stress fractures

It mostly occurs in athletes who engage in running, basketball, gymnastics, dance and tennis. They are a higher risk due to repetitive stress that is placed on their feet and ankles. Compared to the fracture which is broken a bone, a stress fracture is just a small crack in the bone. It happens when repeated impact happens on a bone, and your muscles are unable to absorb that pressure.

Heel spur

The condition occurs when there are calcium deposits which result to a bony protrusion on your heel bone. Those people who are prone to this kind of state are the athletes with feet that are very flat or high arches. Other factors which may cause it are improper footwear or running on hard surfaces. You will mostly experience extreme pain when you are either standing or walking. Most people can recover without surgery by either physical therapy, muscle or tendon tapping, heel stretching exercises or using anti-inflammatory medications.

Ankle sprain

Like most ankle sports injuries, you can have a moderate ankle sprain which means that you will experience minimal pain or severe making walking or standing difficult or painful. It involves twisting of your foot that causes damage to the ligaments of an ankle. The most common are inversion ankle sprains which are due to the foot twisting inwards damaging the outer ligaments. Outward twisting of the foot usually causes severe damage to your inside ankle ligaments.

 
By Dr. Pedram A. Hendizadeh
April 08, 2017
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Sports Injuries   Foot Care   foot  

                           

Did you know that 25% of foot sports injuries experienced by the athletes is related to the foot and ankle? It is most especially if you are an athlete who is involved in any sport that will require you to jump and run. Sports which are often associated with the foot and ankle injuries more are running, basketball, soccer, dancing and football because they are placing a considerable performance demand on the feet.

Common Sports-Related Foot Injuries

Plantar fasciitis

It happens when the plantar fascia which is a band of tissue that supports the arch of your foot is subjected to a lot of stress more than it can handle. These muscles will become strained as a result of stress caused by them thus becoming inflamed at the bottom of your heel resulting in pain in that area. The good news is that you there are higher chances that you will be able to recover without having to go for surgery. With the overuse injuries, you will find the rest, ice and physical therapy to be beneficial and useful. Your doctor will mostly recommend you for calf stretches or any other exercise aimed at stretching your feet calves to relieve the pain.

Achilles tendinitis

It is a common foot and ankle problem. Achilles tendinitis is a condition which affects the Achilles tendons which are the largest muscle in your body. Like with all the other musculoskeletal injuries, it also occurs typically due to overuse mostly sports related and degeneration. Many cases of this kind can be treated without surgery depending on how severe and persistent it is. Reducing the amount of stress that you put on your Achilles' tendons is the key to recovery, and that is why patients are advised to rest. Also, it will help a lot to strengthen your calf muscles through reducing the intensity of exercises. Cortisone injections, shock therapy, and physical therapy are incredibly useful when it comes to treating the condition.

Please Click Here For Part 2



Contact Us

Please specify in the message section below which office you would like to be seen at. (Manhasset, Huntington, Plainview & Maspeth NY)

Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset at the Americana

(631) 427-3678 Huntington NY
(516) 869-3300 Manhasset NY
(516) 544-1731 Great Neck NY
(718) 639-0499 Maspeth NY
(516) 681-8866 Plainview NY

Manhasset, NY Office
Advanced Podiatry
2110 Northern Blvd.
Suite-208
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 869-3300

Huntington, NY Office
Advanced Podiatry
181 Main St.
Suite-207
Huntington, NY 11743
(631) 427-3678

Maspeth, NY  Office
Advanced Podiatry
70-01 Grand Ave
Maspeth, NY 11378
(718) 639-0499

Great Neck, NY Office
Advanced Podiatry
488 Great Neck Rd.
Great Neck, NY 11021
516-544-1731
*Moved to Manhasset  

Plainview, NY Office
Advanced Podiatry
875 Old Country Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 681-8866

Rosyn, NY Office
1514 Old Northern Blvd
Rosln, NY 11576
516-484-1420
*Moved to Manhasset