By Dr Alison Croughan
April 30, 2019
Category: Ingrown Toenails
Tags: Ingrown Toenails  

                           ingrown toenails

As podiatrists, our patients are plagued with varied pedal complaints from fractures to sprains to varied skin conditions.  Some pathologies are more common to a specific patient population; adults, geriatric, athletes.  One pathology that does not discriminate and can present in both our youngest and oldest patients are painful ingrown toenails.  Simply, the nail has curved into the skin and pain and swelling develops.  For anyone who has suffered themselves this simple complaint can be quite debilitating, make walking in shoe gear difficult and can even develop into a much more severe infection if left untreated.

The internet offers many at home remedies but do they really work?
 
1. Soak in warm water - YES this can help decrease the inflammation as well as drain unwanted bacteria - we recommend adding Epsom salt as well.  Soaking can also help soften the skin and nail which can make cutting much easier for the patient.
 
2. Place cotton or dental floss under the nail and leave until the nail grows out - this is an older remedy that really only can cause harm at this point, putting a foreign body under the nail can cause irritation. If you are thinking of trying this at home, I would consider a form of "bathroom surgery" and would recommend you calling our office to assist in alleviating your discomfort.
 
3. Soak in apple cider vinegar - although this all-natural remedy has antibacterial and microbial benefits - it is not going to remove the ingrown nail or heal an ongoing infection.
 
4. Avoid wearing tight shoes - wearing tight shoes can increase the friction and irritation of an ingrown nail as well as possibly cause a part of the nail to break off and cause more discomfort.
 
5. Taking an oral antibiotic - some patients before arriving in our office will take leftover antibiotics that they have in their medicine cabinet. Again, we recommend before self-treating in this manner please come to our office for a proper evaluation and treatment.
 
Things to know before arriving in our office - the goal of the visit is to remove the offending nail and drain any local infection and then the doctor will either address with a topical or oral antibiotic.  It is better not to wait and come in before the problem turns into a red, hot, swollen toe/toes.
By Dr Shabana Chowdhury
March 20, 2019
Category: Foot Tips
Tags: foot tips  

                                         

Strappy shoes are cute, but thick skin on top of your toes might be preventing you from wearing this style. The thick skin, otherwise known as corns, is caused from hammertoes. A hammertoe is a bony deformity of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes where the middle joint has become fixed into a clenched position.

Hammertoes may be hereditary. So if your parent or grandparents have crooked toes, you may be more prone to them as well. People with higher arches or  longer toes are more likely to have hammertoes because a lot of weight is being put on the forefoot and the toes are pulling back. This buckling effect can also cause thick calluses on ball of your feet.

Unfortunately, a hammertoe won't go away on its own. Orthotics may be able to help with pain you are getting on the bottom of your feet, however they won't do much for corns on the tops of your toes. The best option for that would be surgery, especially if you don't want to change your lifestyle because of the chronic pain. So don't put away your strappy Manolos just yet - contact your podiatrist to discuss what is best for you.

By Dr. Joseph DiStefano
March 20, 2019
Category: Foot Tips
Tags: NBA Playoffs  

                              

Scrolling through some sports articles over the weekend was mostly the same old news, but an injury report brought one that caught my attention and warrants discussion. The NBA playoffs are coming up, and with the push towards the end of the season, star players are getting more court time. Such was the case for Milwaukee Bucks guard Malcolm Brogdon who suffered a minor plantar fascial tear in his right foot which will require a minimum of 6-8 weeks to fully recuperate from. But wait for Dr. D, you say. You just said it was a minor tear, why so long to heal? I'm glad you asked that loyal reader. 

The plantar fascia is a ligament on the bottom of the foot which starts from the heel bone, runs underneath the arch, and travels to the base of each of the toes. This ligament helps support the structure of the foot. Basketball players and other court-sport athletes are the most susceptible to plantar fascial strains. The high demand of performing on a hard surface, lateral cutting movements, jumping and landing and repetitive periods of high activity and then rest can predispose to issues with the plantar fascia. 

Symptoms can be very mild, ranging from discomfort when walking to extremely severe, where patients cannot put any pressure on their heels and will limp. This injury is very common, something podiatrists see daily, and occurs in all ages and activity levels. The treatments employed depend on the severity of the injury, but generally, most patients do not require a long period of recuperation. Unfortunately, the plantar fascia does not heal quickly, so even an elite athlete sometimes needs a period where no stress is subjected to the plantar fascia. Since the plantar fascia is one of the main structures that support the foot, sometimes that means no walking and running. We try to keep patients on their feet if possible, but each patient is different. Usually, some stretching exercises, rest, physical therapy and custom orthotics are all that are needed to get people back on their feet, raining down threes, smashing winners and pounding the pavement.

By Dr Aarti Kumar
February 28, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Famous Foot  
                        famous foot
 
 
You may recognize this famous foot; and if you don't, it might be better that way! This foot serves as a great teaching model. Some of the obvious issues noted to this foot are:
 
1. Discolored, thickened toenails- most people think any discolored, thickened toenail is from a fungus. While that might be true it is important to know that trauma, bacterial/yeast infestation can also cause such an appearance. Often times, a nail biopsy is taken in the office and sent off for analysis to confirm fungal growth. If fungus is present, various treatments ranging from topical treatments, oral medications to laser treatments are available. At Advanced Podiatry, we work with our patients to choose which options are best for each individual. 
 
2. Bunion- A bump on the inside of the foot may not only be cosmetic in nature but also painful to walk and put shoes on. Bunions may arise due to biomechanical deformities that were never treated such as flat feet or from long years of high heels. The medical term for a bunion is known as hallux abductovalgus in which the joint deviates and causes the great toe to start turning towards the second toe. With severe bunions, the second toe starts to buckle due to the big toe shifting over. The podiatrists at Advanced Podiatry are trained in both conservative and surgical management of bunions. 
 
3. Bunionette/Tailors bunion- A bunionette deformity is analogous to a bunion except the bump is on the outside of the foot. Many times, a callus will form near the bump from friction/rubbing from shoes. This deformity can also cause the fifth toe to drift inwards and develop a corn, Wider and supportive shoe gear are always helpful in preventing this deformity from getting worse. If conservative measures are unhelpful, surgery can be performed to decrease pain and the ability to wear normal shoe gear again. 
 
4. Hammertoes- Buckled toes may arise from biomechanical deformities such as flat feet, high arched feet or some neurological conditions. Unsupportive, narrow shoe gear can also cause hammering of the lesser toes. Some of the conservative treatment options for hammertoes include orthotics to address biomechanical deformities or toe caps to prevent friction. Surgical approaches are available for hammertoes as well depending on the flexibility of the joint. Sometimes, a simple bone removal is sufficient to decompress the joint; other times a fusion of the joint with some kind of internal fixation may be necessary. 
 
If you feel like you may have any of the above-mentioned problems, come in today for an evaluation and discuss the various treatment options available!
By Dr. Shabana Chowdhury
February 21, 2019
Category: Bunions
Tags: Bunion Surgery  

                                           Avoid Metallosis from Bunion Surgery

We do all we can to avoid toxins from entering our bodies. We detox, wear natural makeup and we avoid products with harmful additives. So why are we compliant about possible heavy metal poisoning after elective foot surgery? The hardware placed in your bodies after some foot surgeries can lead to metallosis, which is a medical condition involving deposition and build-up of metal debris in the soft tissues of the body. Abrasion of the metal components of screws placed in your foot during a bunion repair may cause immune reactions within your body. Some of the symptoms of metallosis generally include pain around the site of the implant, rash or pseudotumors.

The SafetyFix System is the first FDA cleared device designed to allow for bunion fixation to occur and all metal hardware to be easily removed. The unique shape of the screw allows the realignment of the bunion correction while keeping the head of the screw just below the surface of the skin. When the bones heal, a small incision is made to remove the screw without having to cut through deep layers of previously healed soft tissue and bone. By removing the screw, the risk of short and long term complications and health problems from metal toxicity is greatly reduced because there is no metal or unnatural foreign material left inside your body.

Feel free to contact your local podiatry office to discuss having your bunion repairs with removable screws.





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Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset at the Americana

(516) 844-0039 - Manhasset, NY
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Manhasset, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
2110 Northern Blvd.
Suite 208
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 844-0039

Huntington, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
181 Main St.
Suite 207
Huntington, NY 11743
(631) 400-3085

Maspeth, NY  Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
70-01 Grand Ave
Maspeth, NY 11378
(718) 747-9250

Great Neck, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
488 Great Neck Rd.
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 544-1731
*moved to Manhasset  

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Advanced Podiatry
875 Old Country Rd
Suite 100
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 544 -1732

Roslyn, NY
1514 Old Northern Blvd
Roslyn, NY 11576
(516) 484-1420
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