By Dr Arden Smith
June 08, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Corns  
                            
If your feet or toes endure excess pressure and friction, you may develop what is known as a corn. It is typically a small and hardened area of skin that will often cause discomfort and pain while wearing shoes. General causes for this condition to occur may originate from wearing shoes that are too small, or from walking for extended periods of time. Once the corns are treated, there may be several ways to prevent this uncomfortable condition from occurring again. These may include wearing shoes and socks that fit properly, using protective pads and by periodically having the corn palliatively debrided by a podiatrist. Research has shown that our feet may become larger as the aging process occurs, and it's important to regularly measure our feet, which can aid in determining the correct shoe size. If you have corns and your daily activities are affected, please schedule a consultation with one of our expert podiatrists at Advanced Podiatry for treatment options that are right for you.
 
 
Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin over a bony prominence. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.
 
Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:
  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support
Treating Corns
Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn't always the case. Minor corrective surgical options are available to eliminate painful and stubborn corns that are effecting your lifestyle. Consult with one of our expert podiatrists to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

 

By Dr Shabana Chowdhury
June 06, 2019
Category: Neuromas
Tags: Neuroma  

                                       

Have you ever had a shooting pain in between your toes while running? Or have you ever felt like there was a rock in your forefoot only to find nothing in your shoe? Did you ever feel a numb sensation in the ball of your foot while wearing heels? These might be indicators of a Neuroma. A Neuroma, also known as an Intermetatarsal Neuroma or Plantar Neuroma, is a condition that affects the nerves of the feet, usually the area between the long bones of your foot. They most commonly affect the third and fourth toe, if so this would be called a Morton's Neuroma.

A Neuroma is a painful condition, also referred to as a "pinched nerve" or a nerve tumor. It is a benign growth of nerve tissue frequently found between the third and fourth toes. It brings on pain, a burning sensation, tingling, or numbness between the toes and in the ball of the foot. This condition can be caused by injury, pressure or irritation. Normally you will not be able to feel a palpable bump on your foot, but instead burning pain in the ball of the foot will be experienced. Numbness and tingling may also occur. A Neuroma can cause pain when in tight or narrow shoes are worn. As the condition worsens, the pain may persist for days, or even weeks.

So what causes the development of a Neuroma? Neuromas can be caused by wearing ill-fitting shoes that cause pressure to the toes, such as high heels. Also, high impact exercise may cause of this condition from repetitive pressure. Neuromas may also develop if the foot sustains an injury. Bunions and flat feet can also cause Neuromas because these foot conditions cause excessive pressure and irritates the tissue.

If Neuroma pain persists longer than a few days with no relief from changing shoes, then it is best to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist. The earlier the condition is treated, the less chance there will be for surgical treatment. A podiatrist can alleviate the effects of a Neuroma by decreasing the pain and help decrease pressure on the nerve. For mild to moderate cases, treatments may include: applying padding to the arch to relieve pressure from the nerve and reduce compression while ambulating. A podiatrist may also create a custom orthotic device to support the foot and reduce compression and pressure on the affected nerve. It is also best to take a break from activities that involve constant pressure on the affected area. Wider shoes help to ease the pressure from the toes. Using a night splint can also help take pressure away from the forefoot. If these treatments are not successful then injection therapy is suggested. This can involve a corticosteroid injection or a series of sclerosing injections.

Surgical treatment may be recommended if all other treatments fail to provide relief. Normally, the surgical procedure involves removal of the affected nerve or to release the nerve.

                                           

Extracorporeal pulse activation technology (EPAT) also known as shockwave therapy is used to treat many chronic inflammatory conditions. EPAT uses noninvasive high energy waves to cause acute inflammation thereby increasing blood circulation and enhancing metabolic processes when chronic inflammation is present to stimulate healing. 

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common pathologies podiatrists evaluate and treat. Podiatrists will try several different ways of treating plantar fasciitis whether it be conservative or surgical measures. At Advanced Podiatry, we offer EPAT for plantar fasciitis that has been unresponsive to oral anti-inflammatories, injections, stretching and custom orthotics. For patients who are not considering surgical intervention, EPAT is a great way to try a conservative yet effective and FDA approved method to control heel pain that has been adamant to treatment. Typically about 3 to 5 treatments are required. EPAT is delivered via ultrasound and typically feels like "snapping rubber bands" which eventually dull down due to repetitive motion. It is important to note that EPAT is not indicated if you are taking antiinflammatories or if you have a pacemaker. Some bruising and pain is normal after EPAT as the body is taking some time to heal. 

If you suffer from chronic heel pain, call and schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists today! No one should have to live with heel pain because there are plenty of several options available.
 
 
 
 
By Dr Arden Smith
May 27, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Good Running Shoe  
                            Basics of a Good Running Shoe
 
By Dr. Arden Smith-Fellow American College of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Fellow American College of Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and Medicine
 
Whether you rarely jog, run a couple of days each week, or regularly race competitively on pavement or trails, a key to enjoying-and enduring-the sport is establishing and maintaining foot health practices, which include periodic shoe fitting and proper selection.
 
There are a few important things to look for when selecting a good pair of supportive running shoes. They include:
 
-When you bend a running shoe from front to back, it should only bend at the ball of the foot.
-The midfoot and hindfoot should be firm.
-Heel counters on the back of running shoes should also be firm to prevent ankles from rolling in or out. -Twisting running shoes with your hands should not allow for a lot of bending.
-You do not want very flexible Since this tends to put grader stress on the feet.
 
The expert doctors at Advanced Podiatry are always happy to check your running shoes for you.
By Dr Arden Smith
May 23, 2019
Category: Foot Care
                         fish-pedicure
By Dr. Arden Smith-Fellow American College of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Fellow American College of Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and Medicine
 
You've heard about salon pedicure fish soaks where the swimmers supposedly eat away dead skin from your soles. The truth is they carry skin cells from client to client. Just say no! Ovoid pedicure soaks if you have any foot/leg cuts, or sores and after a lower leg wax, or shave, which can create small undetectable nicks in the skin that create a portal of entry for bacteria. It's important since there is a rise in Staph infections called MRSA, [Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus] that are hard to treat and resistant to many antibiotics. While tubs should always be drained, cleaned, swabbed with disinfectant, and wiped between each customer, sometimes you can't tell. Salons that use disposable plastic footbath liners add a layer of reassurance. Anyone with compromised circulation, or nerve sensation to the feet should always skip the soak and cuticle part of a pedicure and just get a polish change.
 
If you have any question regarding the possibility of a foot infection, the expert doctors of Advanced Podiatry are always there for you.




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Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset at the Americana

(516) 844-0039 - Manhasset, NY
(631) 400-3085 - Huntington, NY
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(718) 747-9250 - Maspeth, NY
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Manhasset, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
2110 Northern Blvd.
Suite 208
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 844-0039

Huntington, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
181 Main St.
Suite 207
Huntington, NY 11743
(631) 400-3085

Maspeth, NY  Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
70-01 Grand Ave
Maspeth, NY 11378
(718) 747-9250

Great Neck, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
488 Great Neck Rd.
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 544-1731
*moved to Manhasset  

Plainview Office
Advanced Podiatry
875 Old Country Rd
Suite 100
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 544 -1732

Roslyn, NY
1514 Old Northern Blvd
Roslyn, NY 11576
(516) 484-1420
*Moved to Manhasset