By Dr Aarti Kumar
January 16, 2019
Category: Neuromas
Tags: Numbness  

                            

If you are standing outside in the cold for too long these days, chances are your toes might feel numb. But there are many more reasons why legs and feet can feel numb and tingly. The medical terminology for numbness and tingling is called "paresthesias". One of the most common causes of paresthesias in the lower extremities is nerve impingement. It is important to understand that the nerves supplying the feet arise from the lower back region. Any time there is an impingement or back injury, foot and leg numbness is common. Neuromas (inflammation of the nerves) in the foot can  cause "an electric shock type" sensation in the toes and cause numbness in the toes when in shoes. Another common cause of paresthesias is diabetes-most commonly termed diabetic neuropathy.

One of the major reasons why it is important for diabetic patients to see podiatrists every few months is so that we can test your sensation and make sure there are no cuts or scrapes that can lead to serious infections. Poor circulation can lead to cold feet but also numbness. Raynaud's disease is seen more commonly in the winter months and patients frequently come in complaining of "not being able to feel their toes". Some of the other less common causes of paresthesias in the lower limb can be vitamin deficiency, autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis and Celiac's disease, pregnancy, kidney disease and infections such as Lyme disease and shingles. If you are experiencing paresthesias in the lower extremities, make an appointment with the foot specialists at Advanced Podiatry and we can work together to figure out the cause. We work well with other specialists such as neurologists to find the best treatments for our patients.

By Dr Shabana Chowdhury
January 09, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: heels  

                               heels

Many women live by the philosophy that "flats are for failures". However, high heels can take a toll on your feet. Wearing heels for an extended length of time, whether it's dancing or just walking, can lead to many foot problems. Some of these ailments include: blisters, numbness, swelling, and general pain. So how are some women able to add heels into their signature look with no sign of pain? Here are some tricks you can try so that you can fall in  love your heels again.

When buying shoes, pay attention to the thickness of the arch, sole and heel. The thicker the sole, the more cushion between your foot and the ground. For thin soled shoes, consider adding a gel insert to help pad the ball of your foot. Heels with a hidden platform can also help give the illusion of wearing higher heels without affecting arch height. Also the chuckier the heel, the more stable you will feel while walking. Some women buy shoes half size larger to prevent rubbing from the feet swelling up at the end of the day. Excessive rubbing is the cause of painful blisters.

Try some of these suggestions and if you are still having pain while wearing your heels feel free to visit as at Advanced Podiatry!

 
 
 
 
By Dr Joseph DiStefano
January 09, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Trends Shoes  

                       shoetrends

Trends are everywhere in the clothing and shoe business. Within the last 7-10 years, the newest trend in shoes is the minimalist movement. Shoes are lighter, thinner and smaller and every brand, store and cobbler is on board. Within the workout community, sneakers have been one of the main targets for the minimalist shift. The vibram five finger shoes were huge when they first came out and I remember seeing them everywhere. Books were published touting the efficiency and better form associated with "barefoot running" or "natural running" attributed to the professional Kenyan and south African runners. 

But, the real question is, is this the best thing for training? I see many patients in the office who have tried to make the switch, but end up injuring themselves. To run in a minimalist shoe, the running form has to shift from a heel strike, to a forefoot strike. For many people, this will take significant time and training to properly perform. A newer athlete will likely not have the proper muscle tone or form to adequately execute higher intensity workouts, and this can lead to injury. As I tell patients, every foot is different, so by seeing a sports medicine specialist, he or she can tell you how to properly train and condition your body while suggesting appropriate foot wear to allow for less stress on your joints. As your running pattern changes, most people can then begin to transition to lighter shoes. Remember loyal readers: listen to your body. It will tell you if you are pushing too hard, too fast, or too long.

By Dr Arden Smith
January 07, 2019
Category: Foot Tips
Tags: Feet Soft Smooth  
                            soft and smooth feet
 
Your feet probably spend much of the winter stuffed into heavy boots, or fending off cold, dry air outside and overheated air inside. The result: dry, cracked heels and itchy, peeling skin. but when you know how to properly protect and moisturize your feet, they'll stay -comfy and beautiful-all season long.
 
Moisturize your feet when wet-apply moisturizer to still damp feet after every bath or shower. The KAMEA products that are available in our offices are very effective at preventing moisture loss.
 
Heal your heels-get rid of unsightly heel cracks with daily use of the KAMEA products that are available at the kiosk by the front desk in our offices to slough off remaining dead skin cells.
 
Be protective-skip the wool socks when it's chilly outside. The rubbing of wool against your feet removes natural fats from the skin causing moisture loss. In the house, keep slippers or socks on-walking barefoot creates friction that dries feet out.
 
Get shoe smart-wear footwear that fits well. Poorly fitting footwear can rub and lead to hard, ugly calluses on your feet. If your favorite boots are chafing you can try one of our over-the-counter inserts or have us evaluate and scan your foot for a custom made orthotic device -the gold standard for optimal foot function.
 
Diabetics Should Regularly Inspect Their Feet
Good foot care is essential for people with diabetes. Diabetes can cause nerve damage that leads to loss of sensation in the feet, making it difficult to feel sores, blisters, or injuries.
 
People with diabetes should regularly inspect their feet. The best time is immediately after a shower while drying your feet or at the end of the day when removing socks and shoes.If you notice a blister, apply to clean dressing with an antiseptic ointment, try to stay off the foot as much as possible. Contact any of the doctors at Advanced Podiatry, your experts in Diabetic Foot Care as soon as possible, because as Benjamin Franklin said "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. "
By Dr Evan Vieira
January 05, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Appearance  


So many of us suffer with insecurities about our appearance, weight or some other trait that we feel we can't change.  Well, if you are self conscious about your feet, let us help you now!

Let 2019 be the year you finally make the jump.  If you have a bunion, hammertoe or some other foot condition that makes you hide your toes in the sand at the beach, we can help.  From unsightly nails to painful bunions, our doctors treat the full gamut of foot conditions. 

Gym memberships, diet plans and new savings plans will likely crowd your list of New Years resolutions, but don't forget about your feet.  

Advanced Podiatry would love to help you get on your journey to the new you in 2019!





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Please specify in the message section below which office you would like to be seen at. (Manhasset, Huntington & Maspeth)

Advanced Podiatry of Manhasset at the Americana

(516) 844-0039 - Manhasset, NY
(631) 400-3085 - Huntington, NY
(516) 544-1731 - Great Neck, NY
(718) 747-9250 - Maspeth, NY
(516) 544-1722 - Plainview, NY
 

Manhasset, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
2110 Northern Blvd.
Suite 208
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 844-0039

Huntington, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
181 Main St.
Suite 207
Huntington, NY 11743
(631) 400-3085

Maspeth, NY  Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
55-31 69th St.
Maspeth, NY 11378
(718) 747-9250

Great Neck, NY Podiatrist
Advanced Podiatry
488 Great Neck Rd.
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 544-1731
*moved to Manhasset  

Plainview Office
Advanced Podiatry
875 Old Country Rd
Suite 100
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 544-1722

Roslyn, NY
1514 Old Northern Blvd.
Roslyn, NY 11576
(516) 484-1420
*Moved to Manhasset